Monthly Archives: July 2013

Thotakura Teeya Pappu (Sweet Amaranth Dal)

Standard

I learnt about this particular dal at my In-laws house. When I first heard the name, I was taken aback. why would one want to add sugar toΒ  dal? That was pretty unheard of, and I wasn’t sure I even wanted to try it. However, once I tasted it, it sure was a very pleasant surprise, without the addition of any sugar! This dish now takes pride of place on my table most weekends!

This weekend, I had a new crop of amaranth in my home garden, so that’s what I made! πŸ™‚

Fresh Thotakura from my garden

Fresh Thotakura from my garden

Ingredients:

1/2 cup pesara pappu (moong dal)
1 bunch of thotakura (amaranth leaves)
1/2 tsp salt
pinch of inguva (hing, asafoetedia)
pinch of turmeric
Tadka: avalu (mustard seeds), mina pappu (urad dal), red chilli

Method:

  • Cook the dal, chopped leaves, salt and turmeric till the dal is completely done and the amaranth leaves have cooked and mixed with the dal.
  • Take off the flame
  • In a wok, heat some oil with the tadka, add hing and add to the dal.
  • Mix well with the dal
in a bed of hot rice :)

in a bed of hot rice πŸ™‚

This dal is best served hot with rice and a spicy subzi to off-set the sweetness! πŸ™‚

Advertisements

Gutti Bengulooru Mirapakaya (Stuffed Bell Peppers, Capsicum)

Standard

I have been eating this particlar preparation of bengulooru mirapakaya since childhood. It has also been one of my mom’s favorites. So it was made pretty often! πŸ˜‰

After marriage I faced a different problem. The name. I always knew it as simla mirchi or capsicum, and suddenly I was asked if I knew how to make bengulooru mirapakaya. Took me some time to figure out, but I did get it in the end! It didn’t help matters that it was my mom’s fav, but pretty low on my preferred foods. 😦

Ingredients:

  • 8-10 small capsicum (select the smallest size – it’s easier to cook and tastes better)
  • Stuffing: besan, salt, jeera, chilli powder, oil for mixing
    • For every cup of besan, put in 1tsp salt, 1/2 tsp chilli and a pinch of jeera and 1tsp oil to help mix
  • Oil for braising

Method:

  • Clean the capsicum and make a neat slit along the side for stuffing.
fresh capsicum

fresh capsicum

  • Stuff the capsicum fully. This takes a bit of manuvering around the inside to ensure its completely done. Be careful not to completely split it open
Stuffed, and ready to be cooked

Stuffed, and ready to be cooked

  • Heat some oil in a wok. Once heated, add the stuffed capsicum slowly and place lid.
  • Keep turning them time to time so that they get evenly braised.
  • Take off the flame when done. Drain the oil. Some of the stuffing may come out of the capsicum. They can get put back when the capsicum has cooled down
... and ready to eat!

… and ready to eat!

The best part of this vegetable is that the capsicum retains its shape. It can be eaten with rice and dal.

Dondakaya Semi-fry Kura (Ivy Gourd, Coccinia)

Standard

This is a bit of a slow vegetable to cook. Mostly I make this by boiling the vegetable, and then adding the masala to the cooked vegetable and calling it done.

Dondakaya Fry

Dondakaya Fry

However, when my mother-in-law was here recently, she showed me this way of making it. This method apparently is a favourite of Hubby’s as well!

Ingredients:

Method:

  • Put in oil and chopped dondakaya as if to deep fry.
  • Set the lid over the wok so that it (kind of ) can braize (in Telugu: magga pettu)
  • Once the dondakaya starts to soften, take off the lid and deep fry normally. This method used up a little less oil that the regular method, and fries the vegetable evenly.
  • Drain the excess oil into a container. This oil can be used for tadka and other frying purposes.
  • Add the besan and mix well to ensure no clumps are formed, and the dondakaya pieces are properly covered with besan.
  • When cooked, the besan will give off a nice aroma. Add the grated coconut and mix well.
  • The coconut helps the pieces of dondakaya to separate and not clump together.

Serve hot with rice.