Tag Archives: Dal

Senegala Vada (Brown Bengalgram Fritters)

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This is favourite snack, and is available, in various versions, across South Indian households and even restaurants.

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Senegala vada with chutney

This is different from “masala vada” as the masala vada is made with split bengal gram, not the whole one.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups brown senegalu (chana, whole bengal gram) – soaked and drained.
  • 6-8 green chillies
  • 1″ piece of ginger
  • optional – finely chopped onion
  • optional – croasely ground pepper
  • Chopped curry leaves
  • pinch of asafetida/hing
  • 1 tsp salt
  • Oil for frying
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The washed senegalu with chillies and ginger

Method:

  • Rough-grind the soaked senegalu. You may add a bit of water to help in the grinding.
  • Add the chillies and ginger and grind again so they are mixed well.
    • Ensure that the senegalu remain rough, and are not finely ground. That would take away from the texture and taste of the final vada.
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coarsely ground with the chillies and ginger mixed in.

  • remove from jar and add salt and mix well.
  • You may add the other ingredients at this time, and set aside till the oil heats.
  • Wet your fingers and take a bit of the batter and flatten.
    • Ensure that the edges are not broken as this may cause the vada to break while frying.
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Flatten on your fingers

  • Once the oil is heated enough, gently drop this into the oil for frying.
    • You may also use a plastic sheet for shaping the vadas. They can then be dropped from the sheet into the oil.
  • Turn the vada until it is uniformly brown and then take out.
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Frying into a lovely brown

  • Put it on a plate lined with kitchen tissue to soak the excess oil.
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Senegala vada ready!!

Serve hot with coconut chutney! 🙂

 

 

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Seema Vankaya (chow-chow) Pappu

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Seema Vankaya (chow-chow) Pappu

This dal was a learning experience for me. I’d never eaten or cooked this vegetable. So I’d like to share my experience here.

I received a few of the chow-chow / seema vankaya / seemae kathrikaya from my friend on a recent visit to her house. I was a bit curious about it, since it seemed to grow so well at her place. She and her MIL assured me that should it grow well, it was bound to give me a good and constant harvest, which would help my organic garden efforts. Her MIL took the help a little further by giving me a freshly sprouted plant to help me on my way! 🙂 And a couple of the vegetables to cook this weekend.

Double-checking with my own MIL helped me understand a little more about how to cook it. Since i wasn’t too sure about the taste, I opted to make teeya pappu or moong-dal pappu. It turned out pretty well (if I may say so myself)! 😉 The flavor was pretty bland, but paired with a slightly spicy curry/sabzi, it tastes good with hot rice.

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Seema Vankaya / Chow-chow

Ingredients:

  • 2 medium sized chow-chow/seema vankaya
  • 1/2 cup moong-dal/ pesara pappu
  • 1 tsp salt
  • a pinch of turmeric
  • Tadka: 1/2 tsp of aavalu (mustard seeds) and urad dal and 1 broken red chilly

Method:

  • wash, peel and chop the seema vankaya into small pieces. If the vegetable is a bit mature, you may find a core. Cut the core out and use the rest of the vegetable.

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    Chopped into small pieces

  • Was the pesarapappu and add enough water for cooking.
  • Add the seema vankaya pieces, salt and turmeric and pressure cook for 4-5 whistles.
  • After the cooker cools, mash the dal without crushing the vegetable pieces.
  • In a small wok, heat a tsp of oil and add the tadka.
  • When the aavalu start to crackle, add it to the dal.
  • Mix well and let it sit on heat for a few mins.
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Ready to serve!

Serve hot with rice and ghee. 🙂

Thotakura Teeya Pappu (Sweet Amaranth Dal)

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I learnt about this particular dal at my In-laws house. When I first heard the name, I was taken aback. why would one want to add sugar to  dal? That was pretty unheard of, and I wasn’t sure I even wanted to try it. However, once I tasted it, it sure was a very pleasant surprise, without the addition of any sugar! This dish now takes pride of place on my table most weekends!

This weekend, I had a new crop of amaranth in my home garden, so that’s what I made! 🙂

Fresh Thotakura from my garden

Fresh Thotakura from my garden

Ingredients:

1/2 cup pesara pappu (moong dal)
1 bunch of thotakura (amaranth leaves)
1/2 tsp salt
pinch of inguva (hing, asafoetedia)
pinch of turmeric
Tadka: avalu (mustard seeds), mina pappu (urad dal), red chilli

Method:

  • Cook the dal, chopped leaves, salt and turmeric till the dal is completely done and the amaranth leaves have cooked and mixed with the dal.
  • Take off the flame
  • In a wok, heat some oil with the tadka, add hing and add to the dal.
  • Mix well with the dal
in a bed of hot rice :)

in a bed of hot rice 🙂

This dal is best served hot with rice and a spicy subzi to off-set the sweetness! 🙂